Resource Guide | Attorney General - State of Colorado
Topicsort descending Category
Banks Credit and Debt

Various state and federal agencies regulate different types of banks operating throughout the state and across the nation.  To learn more about general banking rules, regulations, and where to file a report against your bank, you may wish to check with the following:

For mortgage and foreclosure concerns:

State Chartered Banks:

Nationally Chartered Banks:

Credit Unions:

Deception or misrepresentations from your bank may also violate the Colorado Consumer Protection Act (CCPA).  If you believe you have been a victimized by your bank or if you wish to report suspicious activity, report it to the Colorado Attorney General. 

If you desire a legal opinion or representation relating to your specific situation, we recommend contacting a private attorney or one of the services that provide legal assistance through the local bar association and/or other legal entities.

Consumer Credit Credit and Debt

The Colorado Uniform Consumer Credit Code (UCCC) is a state law that regulates the terms and conditions of consumer credit in the State of Colorado.  The UCCC does not apply to first mortgage residential acquisition and refinance loans except for its sections on disclosures of the cost of credit, certain consumer remedies, and administrative powers.  Most other consumer credit transactions such as payday loans, automobile loans, second mortgages, state-issued credit cards, and signature loans are subject to the UCCC.

The Colorado Attorney General’s Office, through the Administrator of the Uniform Consumer Credit Code, investigates complaints about lenders and creditors, licenses non-bank lenders such as finance companies and payday lenders, and takes appropriate disciplinary or legal action when a creditor violates the law.  For licensing and discipline information or for additional questions, contact the Colorado Uniform Consumer Credit Code section within the Colorado Attorney General’s Office.

If you desire a legal opinion or representation relating to your specific situation, we recommend contacting a private attorney or one of the services that provide legal assistance through the local bar association and/or other legal entities.

Credit Card Surcharges Credit and Debt

Under Colorado law, it is illegal for any merchant to impose a surcharge on a purchaser or lessee who elects to use a credit or charge card in lieu of payment by cash, check, or similar means.  A surcharge is any additional amount imposed at the time of the sales or lease transaction by the merchant, seller, or lessor that increases the charge to the purchaser or lessee for the privilege of using a credit or charge card and includes those cards pursuant to which unpaid balances are payable on demand. 

This prohibition does NOT apply to convenience fees charged by a state or local government entity which accepts payment by credit or charge card and does NOT apply to debit cards. 

A discount offered by a seller or lessor for the purpose of inducing payment by cash, check, or other means not involving the use of a seller or lender credit card does NOT constitute a finance charge if such discount is offered to all prospective purchasers and its availability is disclosed to all prospective purchasers clearly and conspicuously.

For additional questions, contact the Colorado Uniform Consumer Credit Code section within the Colorado Attorney General’s Office.

If you desire a legal opinion or representation relating to your specific situation, we recommend contacting a private attorney or one of the services that provide legal assistance through the local bar association and/or other legal entities.

Credit Cards Credit and Debt

Credit Cards have been quickly gaining in popularity and overall usage over the years.  If a credit card is issued by a Colorado company, bank, or credit union, those cards must comply with the Colorado Uniform Consumer Credit Code.  For additional information, contact the Colorado Uniform Consumer Credit Code section within the Colorado Attorney General’s Office.  

Although Colorado businesses must conform to the Colorado rules, most credit cards are issued by national institutions located in other states.  For additional information regarding nationally issued bank cards, contact the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. 

If you desire a legal opinion or representation relating to your specific situation, we recommend contacting a private attorney or one of the services that provide legal assistance through the local bar association and/or other legal entities.

Credit Freeze Credit and Debt

Colorado consumers have the option of requesting any consumer reporting agency (credit bureau) to place a security freeze on your credit report. You will be able to place a security freeze on your credit reports by making a request in writing by certified mail to each consumer reporting agency you want to place a security freeze on your file. Once a security freeze is in place, the consumer reporting agency will not be able to release your credit report, or any information contained in that report, without your prior express authorization.

A consumer reporting agency must place a security freeze on your credit report within 5 business days after receiving your written request and must send you written confirmation of the security freeze within ten business days. They must provide you with a unique personal identification number or password for you to use in providing later authorization for the release of information from your credit report.

To view information on requesting a security freeze from the three largest consumer reporting agencies, visit the following web sites:

If you want potential creditors to be able to access information on your credit report, you must request that the freeze be temporarily lifted and provide the following information:

  • Proper identification
  • The unique personal identification number and password provided by the consumer reporting agency
  • The proper information regarding the third party who is to receive the credit report or the time period that the report shall be available.

The consumer reporting agency must remove a security freeze within three business days of receiving a request for removal from you for a fee not to exceed $12.00.  Remember, your failure to timely or correctly request a temporary or permanent removal of a security freeze on your account may result in the loss or denial of credit.

Note: A security freeze placed on a consumer’s credit report will not block all access to that report, or to the information contained in that report, such as current or prospective assignee of a financial obligation and from a state or local agency, law enforcement, the courts, private collection agency, or persons acting pursuant to a court order, warrant, or subpoena authorizing the use of the credit report. 

For additional information, see also the “Creditor Fraud Center” within this site.

If you desire a legal opinion or representation relating to your specific situation, we recommend contacting a private attorney or one of the services that provide legal assistance through the local bar association and/or other legal entities.

 

Credit Repair Credit and Debt

A credit repair agency is any person or business that, for a fee, advertises or claims they can improve your credit record or report.  Some companies charge money to correct or erase bad credit. Bad credit, if correct, cannot be legally removed from your credit report. Consumers can correct their own credit report at no cost by contacting the credit reporting agencies. See also “Credit Reports” in this Resource Guide. 

The Colorado Attorney General’s Office, through the Administrator of the Uniform Consumer Credit Code, investigates complaints about credit repair agencies and takes appropriate disciplinary or legal action when a creditor violates the law.   For licensing and discipline information or for additional questions, contact the Colorado Uniform Consumer Credit Code section within the Colorado Attorney General’s Office.

If you desire a legal opinion or representation relating to your specific situation, we recommend contacting a private attorney or one of the services that provide legal assistance through the local bar association and/or other legal entities.

Credit Reports Credit and Debt

A credit report is a report compiled and issued by a consumer reporting agency which lists activity that may affect your credit standing, including your creditors, the amount of your debts, your credit limits, late payments, defaults, charge-offs, repossessions and bankruptcies.

Consumers are entitled to request a free credit report every 12 months from each of the three main credit reporting companies by using

Consumers can contact one of the following consumer reporting agencies to correct inaccurate information in their credit file or to obtain other information about their credit history:

Click here for additional information on how to place a security freeze on your credit report. 

If you have a complaint against a credit reporting agency, you may file a complaint with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB).

If you desire a legal opinion or representation relating to your specific situation, we recommend contacting a private attorney or one of the services that provide legal assistance through the local bar association and/or other legal entities.

Credit Unions Credit and Debt

To learn more about general credit union general rules, regulations, and where to file a report against your credit union, you may wish to check with the following:

For mortgage and foreclosure concerns:

State Credit Unions:

National Credit Unions:

If you desire a legal opinion or representation relating to your specific situation, we recommend contacting a private attorney or one of the services that provide legal assistance through the local bar association and/or other legal entities.

Debt Collection Credit and Debt

The Colorado Fair Debt Collection Practices Act is a state law that governs the actions of debt collectors and collection agencies. It provides consumers with certain rights and restricts the practices collection agencies may use to attempt to collect debts. For example, the law prohibits collection agencies from using harassment, misleading, and unfair practices.

The law prohibits unnecessary disclosure of the debt to parties not obligated to pay the debt. The law does not apply to creditors collecting their own debts.  The Colorado Attorney General's Office, through the Administrator of the Colorado Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, investigates complaints about collection agencies and takes appropriate disciplinary or legal action when a collection agency has violated the law.

For licensing and discipline information or for additional questions, contact the Colorado Collection Agency Regulation section within the Colorado Attorney General’s Office.

If you desire a legal opinion or representation relating to your specific situation, we recommend contacting a private attorney or one of the services that provide legal assistance through the local bar association and/or other legal entities.

Debt Settlement Credit and Debt

The Colorado Uniform Debt Management Services Act (DMSA) regulates companies that offer and provide debt management services to Colorado residents while providing consumer protections.

Under Colorado law, Debt Management Services Providers (Providers) include non-profit and for-profit Credit Counseling and Debt Settlement companies.  Providers typically work with unsecured debt such as credit card debt.  The law also applies to law firms and attorneys unless the attorney is licensed to practice law in Colorado and is providing legal services in an attorney-client relationship.

For licensing and discipline information or for additional questions, contact the Colorado Uniform Consumer Credit Code section within the Colorado Attorney General’s Office.

If you desire a legal opinion or representation relating to your specific situation, we recommend contacting a private attorney or one of the services that provide legal assistance through the local bar association and/or other legal entities.

Rent-to-Own Credit and Debt

Rent-to-Own companies typically lease products in exchange for a regular, ongoing payment with the option to purchase the products within the allotted time contained within the agreement.  The Colorado Attorney General’s Office, through the Administrator of the Uniform Consumer Credit Code, investigates complaints about rent-to-own businesses and takes appropriate disciplinary or legal action when a creditor violates the law. 

For additional questions, contact the Colorado Uniform Consumer Credit Code section within the Colorado Attorney General’s Office.

If you desire a legal opinion or representation relating to your specific situation, we recommend contacting a private attorney or one of the services that provide legal assistance through the local bar association and/or other legal entities.